Dr. Maurice R. Odiere

Principal Research Officer

Dr. Odiere is a Principal Research Officer at KEMRI’s Centre for Global Health Research (CGHR) and Head of the center’s Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) Unit. His formal training is in Parasitology (PhD, 2010) with a background in leishmaniasis, malaria and helminth infections.

Dr. Odiere has a great interest in parasite biology & immunology, nutrition, epidemiology and control of NTDs, social science research and research ethics.

His focus for the last few years has been studies on human schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths. Specifically, Dr. Odiere’s current research focuses on understanding the geographic distribution, prevalence, intensity and morbidities associated with schistosomiasis and intestinal worms and how people’s immune systems respond to these infections. He is also evaluating the Mass Drug Administration Control Strategies for Schistosomiasis and STHs, understanding persistent ‘hotspots’ for schistosomiasis, and evaluating performance of diagnostic tools with a view to developing more sensitive alternative tests to the Kato-Katz technique.

 

His research team has been involved in the development of a Multiplex Bead Assay (MBA) that provides a robust approach to the simultaneous analysis of antibody responses to multiple antigens using a single blood sample. In the public health context, this assay platform has the potential to generate an epidemiologic snapshot of community exposures to infections of interest. The team has also conducted studies on identification of strategies for strengthening Primary Health Care System in the control NTDs, and qualitative studies towards understanding of the socio-economic and cultural dynamics of schistosomiasis transmission.

Dr. Odiere is a Principal Research Officer at KEMRI’s Centre for Global Health Research (CGHR) and Head of the center’s Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) Unit. His formal training is in Parasitology (PhD, 2010) with a background in leishmaniasis, malaria and helminth infections.

Dr. Odiere has a great interest in parasite biology & immunology, nutrition, epidemiology and control of NTDs, social science research and research ethics.

His focus for the last few years has been studies on human schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths. Specifically, Dr. Odiere’s current research focuses on understanding the geographic distribution, prevalence, intensity and morbidities associated with schistosomiasis and intestinal worms and how people’s immune systems respond to these infections. He is also evaluating the Mass Drug Administration Control Strategies for Schistosomiasis and STHs, understanding persistent ‘hotspots’ for schistosomiasis, and evaluating performance of diagnostic tools with a view to developing more sensitive alternative tests to the Kato-Katz technique.

His research team has been involved in the development of a Multiplex Bead Assay (MBA) that provides a robust approach to the simultaneous analysis of antibody responses to multiple antigens using a single blood sample. In the public health context, this assay platform has the potential to generate an epidemiologic snapshot of community exposures to infections of interest. The team has also conducted studies on identification of strategies for strengthening Primary Health Care System in the control NTDs, and qualitative studies towards understanding of the socio-economic and cultural dynamics of schistosomiasis transmission.

Dr. Maurice Odiere

Publications

  1. Won K.Y., Kanyi H.M., Mwende F.M., Wiegand R.E., Goodhew, E.B., Priest J.W.,

Lee Y, Njenga S.M., Secor W.E., Lammie P.J. Odiere M.R. 2017. Multiplex Serologic Assessment of Schistosomiasis in Western Kenya: Antibody Responses in Preschool Aged Children as a Measure of Reduced Transmission. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 96(6), 1460-1467.

  1. Kepha S., Mwandawiro C.S., Anderson R.M., Pullan R.L., Nuwaha F., Cano J., Njenga S.M., Odiere M.R., Allen E., Brooker S.J., Nikolay B. 2017. Impact of single annual treatment and four-monthly treatment for hookworm and Ascaris lumbricoides, and factors associated with residual infection among Kenyan school children. Infectious Diseases of Poverty. 6(1):30.
  2. Scobie H.M., Patel M., Martin D., Mkocha H., Njenga S.M., Odiere M.R., Pelletreau S., Priest J.W., Thompson R., Won K.Y., Lammie P.J. 2017. Tetanus Immunity Gaps in Children 5-14 Years and Men ≥ 15 Years of Age Revealed by Integrated Disease Serosurveillance in Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 96(2):415-420.

Dr. Pauline N.Mwinzi

is currently a Chief Research Officer in CGHR at the NTD Research Unit. She served previously as the PI for the KEMRI-CDC Cooperative Agreement one and a half years.

 

Dr. Mwinzi’s specialization is in Parasitology and Immunology. She obtained her PhD in 2005 from the Universiteit Utrecht (UU) in the Netherlands. Her current research interests are in understanding immune mechanisms related to development of resistance to schistosome infections, as well as in operational research for the control and elimination of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs). She serves as a reviewer in the Scientific and Ethics Review Unit (SERU) at KEMRI and uses her experience in bioethics to train research teams in the ethical conduct of biomedical research.

 

Dr. Mwinzi is currently a Principal Investigator for the following four studies:

 

  1. An NIH RO1 funded study on The Role of 1gE in human schistosomiasis (RO1) (STC-Biologics)
  2. A Merck KGa funded study on Effect of Schistosoma mansoni infection on incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria among 1-5 year old children in western Kenya
  3. An EFINTD funded study on Control of Schistosomiasis in an Urban setting in western Kenya: Closing the gap through targeting street children (EFINTD.org)
  4. A B&MGF funded study (through UGA SCORE) on Comparison of school and community-based mass drug administration delivery strategies for control of Schistosoma mansoni infections in western Kenya in areas with >25% prevalence (SCORE SM2) (uga.edu/score)

 

She is also a co-investigator in several other studies. Dr. Mwinzi is part of the team that founded the Annual KEMRI NTD Conference, which is now in its 11th year. She is the immediate past Chair of the KEMRI Annual Scientific Health Conference (KASH) and Chair of the Management Board of the ARNTD (www.arntd.org). In addition, Dr. Mwinzi, jointly with her colleagues, also established the “American Society for Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (ASTMH) in Kenya” convened alongside KASH. Her other achievements include the high number of published papers and papers presented in local conferences as senior author.

Dr. Mwinzi has authored over 60 publications in peer review journals, provided technical support to the WHO/AFRO NTD programme and Mapping Project for Schistosomiasis and Soil-Transmitted helminths (STHs) and supported WHO NTD control activities in the African Region from time to time. At the international level she serves on the Scientific Advisory Committees for Deworm 3, and the Schistosomiasis Control Initiative (SCI). Her contribution in academia includes teaching Bioethics at the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology (JOOUST) and Immunology of Parasitic Infections at the University of Maseno. In

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Publications

  1. Ho J, Odhiambo G, Meng’anyi LW, Musuva RM, Mule JM, Alaly ZS, Odiere MR, Mwinzi PN, Ganley-Leal L. Evaluation of medicine retail outlets for sale of typhoid fever vaccine among adults in two urban and rural settings in western Kenya: a proof-of-concept study. BMC Health Serv Res. 2016;16(1):527.
  2. Odhiambo GO, Musuva RM, Odiere MR, Mwinzi PN. Experiences and perspectives of community health workers from implementing treatment for schistosomiasis using the community directed intervention strategy in an informal settlement in Kisumu City, western Kenya. BMC Public Health. 2016;16:986. doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3662-0.
  3. Ezeamama AE, He CL, Shen Y, Yin XP, Binder SC, Campbell CH Jr, Rathbun S, Whalen CC, N’Goran EK, Utzinger J, Olsen A, Magnussen P, Kinung’hi S, Fenwick A, Phillips A, Ferro J, Karanja DM, Mwinzi PN, Montgomery S, Secor WE, Hamidou A, Garba A, King CH, Colley DG. Gaining and sustaining schistosomiasis control: study protocol and baseline data prior to different treatment strategies in five African countries. BMC Infect Dis. 2016;16:229. doi: 10.1186/s12879-016-1575-2.
  4. Onkanga IO, Mwinzi PN, Muchiri G, Andiego K, Omedo M, Karanja DM, Wiegand RE, Secor WE, Montgomery SP. Impact of two rounds of praziquantel mass drug administration on Schistosoma mansoni infection prevalence and intensity: a comparison between community wide treatment and school based treatment in western Kenya. Int J Parasitol. 2016;46(7):439-45. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2016.01.006.
  5. Ng’etich AI, Rawago FO, Jura WG, Mwinzi PN, Won KY, Odiere MR. A cross-sectional study on schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths in Mbita district, western Kenya using different copromicroscopic techniques. Parasit Vectors. 2016;9:87. doi: 10.1186/s13071-016-1368-x.
  6. Brieger WR, Sommerfeld JU, Amazigo UV; CDI Network. The Potential for Community-Directed Interventions: Reaching Underserved Populations in Africa. Int Q Community Health Educ. 2015;35(4):295-316. doi: 10.1177/0272684X15592757.
  7. Mwinzi PN, Muchiri G, Wiegand RE, Omedo M, Abudho B, Karanja DM, Montgomery SP, Secor WE. Predictive Value of School-Aged Children’s Schistosomiasis Prevalence and Egg Intensity for Other Age Groups in Western Kenya. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;93(6):1311-7. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.15-0467.
  8. Kepha S, Nuwaha F, Nikolay B, Gichuki P, Mwandawiro CS, Mwinzi PN, Odiere MR, Edwards T, Allen E, Brooker SJ. Effect of Repeated Anthelminthic Treatment on Malaria in School Children in Kenya: A Randomized, Open-Label, Equivalence Trial. J Infect Dis. 2016;213(2):266-75. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiv382.
  9. Lai YS, Biedermann P, Ekpo UF, Garba A, Mathieu E, Midzi N, Mwinzi P, N’Goran EK, Raso G, Assaré RK, Sacko M, Schur N, Talla I, Tchuenté LA, Touré S, Winkler MS, Utzinger J, Vounatsou P. Spatial distribution of schistosomiasis and treatment needs in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and geostatistical analysis. Lancet Infect Dis. 2015;15(8):927-40. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00066-3. Erratum in: Lancet Infect Dis. 2015;15(7):761.
  10. Corstjens PL, Nyakundi RK, de Dood CJ, Kariuki TM, Ochola EA, Karanja DM, Mwinzi PN, van Dam GJ. Improved sensitivity of the urine CAA lateral-flow assay for diagnosing active Schistosoma infections by using larger sample volumes. Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:241. doi: 10.1186/s13071-015-0857-7.

Rosemary M. Musuva

is a Research Officer in CGHR. She has a formal training in Public Health and social science research.

Ms. Musuva is currently a Principal Investigator for a B&MGF funded study (through UGA SCORE) on the Impact of Mass Drug Administration for Control of Schistosoma mansoni infections in Kisumu, Siaya and Homa Bay Counties. Understanding factors associated with sustained high prevalence in some areas despite repeated high treatment coverage.

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Publications

  1. 1.     Musuva RM, Matey E, Masaku JM, Odhiambo GO, Mwende F, Thuita I, Kihara J, Njomo DW. Lessons from implementing mass drug administration for soil transmitted helminths among pre-school aged children during school based deworming program at the Kenyan coast. BMC Public Health (In Press)

    2.     Masaku J, Mwende F, Odhiambo G, Musuva R, Matey E, Kihara JH, Thuita IG, Njomo DW. Knowledge, practices and perceptions of geo-helminthes infection among parents of pre-school age children of coastal region, Kenya. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017;11(3):e0005514. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005514.

    3.     Ho J, Odhiambo G, Meng’anyi LW, Musuva RM, Mule JM, Alaly ZS, Odiere MR, Mwinzi PN, Ganley-Leal L. Evaluation of medicine retail outlets for sale of typhoid fever vaccine among adults in two urban and rural settings in western Kenya: a proof-of-concept study. BMC Health Serv Res. 2016;16(1):527.

    4.     Odhiambo GO, Musuva RM, Odiere MR, Mwinzi PN. Experiences and perspectives of community health workers from implementing treatment for schistosomiasis using the community directed intervention strategy in an informal settlement in Kisumu City, western Kenya. BMC Public Health. 2016;16:986. doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3662-0.

    5.     Omedo M, Ogutu M, Awiti A, Musuva R, Muchiri G, Montgomery SP, Secor WE, Mwinzi P. The effect of a health communication campaign on compliance with mass drug administration for schistosomiasis control in western Kenya–the SCORE project. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014;91(5):982-8. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0136.

    6.     Odhiambo GO, Musuva RM, Atuncha VO, Mutete ET, Odiere MR, Onyango RO, Alaii JA, Mwinzi PN. Low levels of awareness despite high prevalence of schistosomiasis among communities in Nyalenda informal settlement, Kisumu city, western Kenya. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2014;8(4):e2784. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002784.

    7.     Musuva RM, Awiti A, Omedo M, Ogutu M, Secor WE, Montgomery SP, Alaii J, Mwinzi PN. Community knowledge, attitudes and practices on schistosomiasis in western Kenya–the SCORE Project. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014;90(4):646-52. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.13-0488.

     

Elizabeth A.Ochola

Elizabeth A. Ochola is a Laboratory Technologist. She is currently pursuing PhD studies in Health Geography at the University of Waterloo, Canada. Ms. Ochola has a Master of Science degree in Medical Parasitology from Maseno University and a BSc. in Biology (Biomedical Sciences) from the University of Eastern Africa- Baraton. Ms. Ochola’s PhD research is on the impact of structural inequalities on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs), and how this affects health and well-being in sub-Saharan Africa. This research is part of an extensive study named the Global Index of Well-being (GLOWING), which aims to develop indicators that measure well-being in low to middle-income countries (LMICs) to enable policy makers  make evidence-based decisions that improve the wellbeing of a country’s citizens.

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Publications

    1. Meurs L, Brienen E, Mbow M, Ochola EA, Mboup S, Karanja DM, Secor WE, Polman K, van Lieshout L. Is PCR the Next Reference Standard for the Diagnosis of Schistosoma in Stool? A Comparison with Microscopy in Senegal and Kenya. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2015;9(7):e0003959. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003959.
    2. Corstjens PL, Nyakundi RK, de Dood CJ, Kariuki TM, Ochola EA, Karanja DM, Mwinzi PN, van Dam GJ. Improved sensitivity of the urine CAA lateral-flow assay for diagnosing active Schistosoma infections by using larger sample volumes. Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:241. doi: 10.1186/s13071-015-0857-7.
    3. Worrell CM, Bartoces M, Karanja DM, Ochola EA, Matete DO, Mwinzi PN, Montgomery SP, Secor WE. Cost analysis of tests for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in children in western Kenya. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;92(6):1233-9. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0644.
    4. Foo KT, Blackstock AJ, Ochola EA, Matete DO, Mwinzi PN, Montgomery SP, Karanja DM, Secor WE. Evaluation of point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen assays for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in low-, moderate-, and high-prevalence schools in western Kenya. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;92(6):1227-32. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0643.
    5. Mwinzi PN, Kittur N, Ochola E, Cooper PJ, Campbell CH Jr, King CH, Colley DG. Additional Evaluation of the Point-of-Contact Circulating Cathodic Antigen Assay for Schistosoma mansoni Infection. Front Public Health. 2015;3:48. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2015.00048.
    6. Davis SM, Wiegand RE, Mulama F, Kareko EI, Harris R, Ochola E, Samuels AM, Rawago F, Mwinzi PM, Fox LM, Odiere MR, Won KY. Morbidity associated with schistosomiasis before and after treatment in young children in Rusinga Island, western Kenya. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;92(5):952-8. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0346.
    7. Won KY, Abudho B, Blackstock AJ, Montgomery SP, Kennedy ED, Person B, Mwinzi PN, Ochola EA, Foo KT, Hightower AW, Karanja DM, Secor WE. Assessment of quality of life as a tool for measuring morbidity due to Schistosoma mansoni infection and the impact of treatment. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014;90(2):322-8. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.13-0361.

    Muok EM, Simiyu EW, Ochola EA, Ng’ang’a ZW, Secor WE, Karanja DM, Mwinzi PN. Association between CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and fecal excretion of Schistosoma mansoni eggs in patients coinfected with S. mansoni and human immunodeficiency virus before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013;89(1):42-5. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.13-0045.

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